Tiggzi And The Backend as a Service Ecosystem Map by Kinvey

Our friends at Kinvey posted an update to their really nice Backed as a Service Ecosystem map. Some call it the subway map, the Pacman map, or you can also look at it as “Where we fly map”.

Thank you to Kinvey for including Tiggzi, we really appreciate it.

Tiggzi is right there:

A lot has changed in Tiggzi in the past couple of months so I would like to offer an update. Hopefully the map can be updated.

I don’t believe Mobile SDK is the best fit for Tiggzi (and other players such Sencha and Appcelerator). Tiggzi is much more than a mobile SDK, in fact, it’s a mobile app platform (more about it below). One suggestion is to add a new line that would include Tiggzi and others such as Appcelerator.

Tiggzi is a mobile app platform, and one of its biggest components is the mobile app builder.


Drag and drop app builder

It’s a cloud-based, drag and drop builder (IDE) for creating HTML5, jQuery Mobile and PhoneGap apps. As Tiggzi app builder uses jQuery Mobile and PhoneGap to create apps — it’s probably best to list it on a separate line with lines going to jQuery Mobile and PhoneGap (already exists). Again, this is just my opinion.

In early July we launched Backend Services under io.tiggzi.com. The first feature in the backend services is a cloud database.


Database features


Database web console

We are also working on Push, File storage, Server-side code, and Analytics features. I think there should be a line going from Tiggzi to BaaS line (io.tiggzi.com) – similar to Sencha’s connection to Sencha.io.

To summarize, this is Tiggzi mobile platform:

  • Visual UI builder (HTML5, JavaScript, CSS, libraries such as jQuery Mobile, PhoneGap, etc)
  • 3rd party REST API services
    • Plug-ins (pre-packaged API services and pages)
  • Backend services
    • Database
    • Push (available soon)
    • File storage (soon)
    • Server-side code (soon)
    • Analytics (soon)
  • HTML5 app hosting
  • Binary build

The Client-Cloud Paradigm and the API Economy

Exadel’s David Schoenbach published a very interesting article on how APIs are exposing value and changing the nature of the Internet.

In 2012, the client-server par­a­digm, which has dom­i­nated ap­pli­ca­tion ar­chi­tec­ture — and the modern Web architecture which is its most modern in­car­na­tion — over the past twenty years, is giving ground to a more broadly dis­trib­uted client-cloud ap­proach. As this shift hap­pens, it promises to un­lock value in pre­vi­ously under-utilized en­ter­prise data and media con­tent. The cat­a­lyst for this change is to be found in the ex­plo­sion of ap­pli­ca­tion pro­gram­ming in­ter­faces, or APIs, which ex­pose re­sources within and be­yond the cor­po­rate fire­wall and re­de­fine the on­line economy.

Read the entire article

Cloud-based HTML5, jQuery Mobile, PhoneGap, and REST App Builder at Mobile World Congress 2012 in Barcelona

We are going to be at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, February 27 – March 1, 2012. Stop by our stand and learn how incredibly easy it is to build HTML5, jQuery Mobile, PhoneGap, and REST mobile apps using Tiggzi, the cloud-based mobile app builder. If you want, BYOR (Bring Your Own REST) and we will build a mobile app using your REST service.

Mapping the Tools in the Mobile Development Ecosystem – And How Tiggzi Mobile App Builder Fits In

ReadWriteMobile has posted an interesting Infographic created by Kinvey mapping the current mobile ecosystem (click on image to view larger version):

(Image source: http://kinvey.com/images/kinvey_backend-as-a-service_mobileecosystem_2100px.png)

First of all thanks to Kinvey for creating this wonderful map and including Tiggzi in it (blue Mobile SDK line). Tiggzi could actually span 3 different lines: BaaS, Mobile SDK and Mobile API. Tiggzi is a cloud-based HTML5 mobile app builder, so it’s not exactly a mobile SDK. In fact, the technology under the hood is HTML, JavaScript and jQuery Mobile. For hybrid apps, the app can be wrapped in PhoneGap, which also provides access to native device features. So, there is no really “custom” SDK.

Second, from the builder it’s incredibly easy to consume any REST API (yellow Mobile API line). Tiggzi comes with a pretty nice REST services console where any service can be tested. From the same console, the REST service response (structure) can be automatically created. Once the service is defined, it is mapped to jQuery Mobile UI using a visual mapper (UI to service input, service output to UI).

Thirdly, as most BaaS services (orange line) are exposed as REST, HTML5 mobile app built in Tiggzi, can easily connect and use those services.

Lastly, and maybe the most important point is how incredibly fast you can build apps. It sort of all makes sense.. you got cloud-based mobile backend (exposed as REST) and cloud-based app builder to build the apps. It sounds simple.. but a really elegant picture.

This perfectly describes Tiggzi. Tiggzi is cloud-based builder for creating HTML5, jQuery Mobile, PhoneGap, and RESTful mobile apps.

Webinar: Learn How to Build Mobile Apps in the Cloud with HTML5, jQuery Mobile, REST, and PhoneGap

In this fas­ci­nating hands-on we­binar, a real mo­bile app will be built, con­nected to a REST ser­vice, and tested. Attendees will be be able to test the app as it’s being built. Beyond that, we will also cover some of the ex­citing fea­tures of the new ver­sion of Tiggr that will have been re­leased by then (under a new name…).

Learn How to Build Mobile Apps in the Cloud with HTML5, jQuery Mobile, REST, and PhoneGap
January 19, Thursday
11am US Pacific Time
Register: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/486123896

Pretty Darn Good Tools – Building a Mobile App With Tiggr and Parse

I’m not sure whether there is any other way to describe it but building a mobile app in Tiggr Mobile Apps Builder and connecting to Parse mobile back end is super easy and fast!

Here is how the app look in design time in Tiggr:

There are three REST services on the right which connect to Parse mobile back end. The services are for loading the current list items, creating new list item and deleting a list item. For example, this is how the service URL to get all List items looks:

https://{username}:{password}@api.parse.com/1/classes/List

List – is a class I created in Parse.

This is how the service URL looks for deleting an item:

https://{username}:{password}@api.parse.com/1/classes/List/{objectId}

objectId – is the class Id to delete.

Parse mobile back end is very easy to use and is very elegant.

Here is how the actual app look when running:

I’ll publishing the actual tutorial on how to build this app.

It’s almost funny how fast a mobile app can be build using Tiggr and Parse. The app was built in about 30 minutes, with nothing to download or install, all the tools are in the cloud.

Happy New Year!

Visual Mapper: jQuery Mobile to REST Services

Mapping mobile UI to service is one of the most basic tasks in any mobile app (or a standard Web application). Input data entered by the user is sent to the service (input), the service is invoked, returns data (result) is sent back to the app for displaying results. Tiggr Mobile Apps Builder makes it super easy to map UI to service. Let’s look at an example.

REST service settings:

REST service input parameters:

REST service output parameters:

To open the standard mapping editor, there are two buttons in properties for a service:

Mapping UI to service look like this:

The service input parameters are on the left and are mapped to input components and properties on the right.

Mapping service back to UI for displaying the result looks like this:

The service output parameters are on the left and are mapped to output components and properties on the right.

Now there is even a more visual way to do the same. There is a new Data Mapping tab in the main editor, clicking the tab will open a visual data mapping editor:

That’s a pretty cool way to do mobile UI to REST service mapping.