Learning about Developer Relations: articles from past year

I learned a lot about Developer Relations in 2019 and in the process I have been sharing my experience here. The following is a collection of articles I published in the past year. I hope some of the content is valuable and helps you build and grow your program. I of course continue to learn. I’d love to hear what you think and what other topics I should cover.

How to measure Developer Relations – DevRel meetup recap

Why developers have influence today?

How many developers did we help?

Make developers awesome

Scaling Developer Relations with an online conference for developers

Developers don’t hate marketing

Developer Relations: content series

Applying the Fogg Behavior Model to Developer Relations

Share outcomes and results, not features

SF DevRel meetup at MuleSoft – what I learned and notes

Interesting content ideas you may consider

Where to publish content?

Notes from DevRelCon SF 2019

Notes 📝, Pictures 📷 and More💡from Developer Relations Conference 🥑

Using online meetups to scale your Developer Relations program

Active developers vs. awareness events, an approach we are trying

Why Developer Advocacy programs should consider working with partners

How content creates content

Share outcomes and results, not features

I recently subscribed to #saashackers daily newsletter. Every morning you get a short SaaS growth case study in your inbox. It’s a quick 3-4 minute read that I recommend you try.

Today’s email talked about Mailchimp and how they got to $400 million in revenue from just 550 employees.

What caught my eye was this image and the text that followed:

mailchimp-saashacker
Source: #saashacker newsletter

text after the picture:

They are selling an outcome, not features.

They are selling the thing people actually want, not their software.

Whether you are a direct to consumer brand with 50,000 customers or a mommy blogger with 1,000 subscribers, you want:

  • To build relationships with your customers
  • To increase sign up (by 250%)

You don’t (necessarily) want:

  • Email templates
  • CMS integrations

Source: https://saashacker.co

And this has a very close connection to Developer Relations (or Developer Marketing).

We should be sharing outcomes and results, not features. We should be showing people how to solve problems, not our software.

I’m sure most of you know this but I think it’s worth mentioning. I personally tend to forget about this (sometimes) and also it’s much easier to talk about features than benefits.

Most of you probably also said: “wait.. this is not new at all” 🤦‍♀️🤦‍♂️

You are absolutely correct 🤩

Adam DuVander has created and shared this wonderful page: Share Knowledge, Not Features: The Secret of Marketing to Developers is to Not Use Marketing. It’s Developer Relations classic and my favorite Developer Relations resource. I highly recommend you read and bookmark this page. Adam explains that we should be sharing knowledge, not features.

So, let’s try to share outcomes, results, problem solving and knowledge, not features✌️

Developer Relations Conference in 10 pictures 🥑📸

This week I attended Evans Data Developer Relations Conference held in San Mateo. It was a great conference with great speakers. I took a lot of notes and will publish a separate blog post about the conference. For now, here are 10 pictures from the conference.

devrelconf-program
Data Evans Developer Relations Conference 2019

Continue reading “Developer Relations Conference in 10 pictures 🥑📸”

Why Developer Advocacy programs should consider working with partners

One of the goals of many developer advocacy programs is to reach more new developers. One approach that I leveraged when I was at Appery.io and we leverage even more at IBM Developer is working with partners.  In this blog post I want to share a few reasons why working partners has benefits.

We work with organizations such as Women Who Code, Hacker Dojo, The Den and others. These organizations have their own vibrant developer communities. We also work with developer companies such as Twilio, Slack, Cloudinary, Dashbot, JFrog and others. These companies have their own vibrant developer communities.

There are a number of factors why we like working with partners.

First, and probably the most important – working with partners and external communities allows us to provide developer education to developers who we probably wouldn’t reach otherwise. At the same time, the partner is able to tap in our growing developer community. This has a lot of value to both organizations. A one-off event is probably fine but we like to build a relationship with these organizations. We try to be consistent and host a monthly event. If one event a month is too often, you can try to do once every two month. Event frequency is really up to you.

Continue reading “Why Developer Advocacy programs should consider working with partners”

Learn How to Convert Audio to Text

Converting speech or audio to text has a large number of applications and can bring advanced capabilities to applications.

Image you are running a call center with thousands of simultaneous calls. You would like to identify some trends/analytics such as if the callers are having problems with a particular product or feature. Or if the callers sound frustrated or unhappy about something.

You might also be looking for particular words in the conversation that are being repeated and also need to know the frequency. Being able to analyze such information is vital to businesses. For example, if you identified that callers sound frustrated and the word “broken” is repeated all the time – you can take actions to improve the user experience. First, you can quickly teach the support team how to help with this particular problem, offer a solution or a workaround. Second, you can fix or improve the product.

In general, almost any audio can be converted to text, where the text is then analyzed for trends, analytics that are important to you. One tool that you can use to analyze text is the Watson Tone Analyzer service.

Continue reading “Learn How to Convert Audio to Text”

Kubernetes Hands-on Training

We are running hands-on Containers and Kubernetes training in San Francisco on Tuesday, March 27, 2018. If you are new to Containers, this is a really good workshop you wouldn’t want to miss. Your instructor is Erin McKean who is awesome, she is the founder of Wordnik and loves APIs!

After attending the workshop developers will learn:

  • Understand the value that containers can bring to your applications
  • Differentiate between containers and VMs
  • Container orchestration (Kubernetes/K8s)
  • The value that containers can bring to your applications
  • How to differentiate between containers and VMs
  • The basics of containers
  • The current landscape of container orchestration and get hands-on practice with orchestrating your own containers with a simple Kubernetes exercise

Register for this workshop.

Great Index Conference Sessions I Attended with Videos

At the end of February IBM hosted its first open developer community conference called Index in San Francisco.  At the conference I was helping as a “room captain”. My duties included greeting the speaker, and ensuring the video/audio equipment was running smoothly as all the talks were recorded. Pretty simple 😉.

The conference had a number of very interesting sessions that I wanted to attend and most of them were in the same track – The Rise of the Human Side of Technology.  This worked very nice as I volunteered to be the room captain for sessions that I actually wanted to attend.

Below you will find the session I attended and links to videos. I highly recommend you watch the videos as all the talks were great.

Bear Douglas Lead Developer Advocate at Slack, in her talk Getting out of the bubble with global developer communities, covered strategies for planning and executing your first global developer tour – particularly in regions where you are less connected or unfamiliar with your developers. Watch the session video.

Alaina Kafkes Software Engineer at Medium, in her talk Tackling Technical Writing, covered empathetic, accessible, and thorough technical tutorials & blog posts break down tech’s barrier to entry and foster inclusion. Alaina shared actionable pointers to get people started with technical writing. Watch the session video.

Stephanie Morillo Content Manager at DigitalOcean, in her talk Creating a Sustainable Documentation Framework for Open Source Projects, discussed how content strategy inspired me to think beyond writing & editing Bundler’s docs, to thinking of docs as a product in itself. Watch the session video.

Sandra Person Global PM at Mozzila, in her talk Reflections on the Mozilla Developer Roadshow Journey talked about spending 10 months on the road collaborating with global partners and local meetups, influential speakers and freshly minted contributors, to bring over 57 Developer Roadshow programs all around the world. Watch the session video.

The following session is from Programming languages and platforms track.

Amahdy Abdelaziz, Developer Advocate at Vaadin, in his talk on Dismantling a Progressive Web App, demonstrated how you can actually build modern web applications that qualify as “Progressive Web Apps”. Watch the session video.

Of course there were many other great session and you can watch them all on the IBM Code YouTube channel.

I’m an IBMer!

About four weeks ago I officially became an IBMer! I joined as San Francisco City Lead for Developer Advocacy.

Some of you are probably wondering why IBM? IBM is big, slow and boring. IBM is very big but it’s not slow or boring. IBM is over a 100 years old and it has repeatedly reinvented itself over and over — in one of the most competitive spaces: technology. Not many companies have done that.

History is great but that’s still not the reason to join a company. Number one is the people. IBMers are like one big family. People are awesome and smart. Always ready to help. I will be working with a team of awesome developer advocates, we will be running educational workshops, attending meetups, conferences, hold office hours and everything in between.  I will be working with teams who work with startups, enterprises, open source and education. I will also have a chance to work with VC companies, incubators and accelerators.

Our goal is to make you a better developer. We want to help you do your job faster and make your job easier. And that’s regardless if you go with IBM technology or not. Our job is to help you, the developer.

The second reason is the wide range of technologies and tools IBM has and has created. There are very few companies out there where you will be exposed to such wide range of technologies. We will be working on Watson, IoT, Containers, Blockchain, Serverless, Bluemix and other technologies.

It’s exciting and exciting time to be a developer!

Please reach out to say hi or if you think we can do something cool together.

Find Out How to Build Cordova Apps Fast

One of the core components in Appery.io platform is a cloud build service which builds a binary file (hybrid) for iOS or Android. Appery.io leverages Apache Cordova (PhoneGap) to create a binary file. Launching the build process is very simple. Right from inside the App builder, clicking the Export button you will see the option to create a binary file for iOS or Android.

 

apperyio_export
Export menu

 

Once Binary (.ipa) or Binary (.apk) is selected, the build process starts. The build process usually takes one minute. When the build is completed, the file is downloaded to your computer. From there you can publish the app to an app store, using the standard publishing process for each store.

Learn more about how to use Apache Cordova in Appery.io to build hybrid apps and use native APIs.

 

Here Is How to Secure a Cloud Database

The Appery.io Database is a cloud database for storing any app data. The app communicates with the cloud database via simple REST API.

To access the database, the database API key is added to each request.

What if you need extra security? Any database collection can be configured with extra security in a few seconds.

Screen Shot 2016-04-22 at 1.05.08 PM
Database collection security and permissions

When you configure a collection with extra security, a user session token has to be included in every request. How to get the session token? A user (from Users collection) needs to do a login. When a login is successful, a session token is returned. This session token is then used with every request. Without the session, the collection can not be accessed.

Another layer of access can be set by checking or unchecking the Read/Write permission. For example, if you uncheck Write, then no request will be able to write anything into the collection, only read the data.

Both the security and Read/Write permissions can be overwritten by including a special master key – which acts as root access.

The Appery.io Database can be configured with a number of security and permissions options to give you the most flexibility when creating your mobile app.

What to learn more? Check out our YouTube channel for many short videos.