Applying the Fogg Behavior Model to Developer Relations

I found about the Fogg Behavior Model from #saashacker newsletter. I found this model super interesting and right away thought if it can be applied to Developer Relations.

Fogg Behavior Model Graphic 2019

First, what is the Fogg Behavior Model? You can find a detailed explanation on https://www.behaviormodel.org/. The model has three main components: Motivation, Ability and Prompts.

The model says that to influence someone to do something, you have just two levers:

  • Motivation – how much someone wants to do something
  • Ability – how easy it is to do the thing

The third component

  • Prompts – is a call to action, trigger or cue for a behavior to happen

So, could this model be applied to developers? Let’s look at each component and see how it can be applied to Developer Relations.

Motivation

So what can motivate developers? Here is a list of motivations:

  • Solving a (challenging) problem (at work or a personal project)
  • Giving back to community. For example, contributing to an open source project
  • Career growth, personal growth, learning

Ability

Ability is how easy it is to do something. I think ability has a strong connection to Developer Relations. We (Developer Advocates) always strive to make things easier for developers. A big part of this is making our documentation, tutorials, videos, guides and everything else easy to follow and complete.

In June at DevRelCon in San Francisco, Steve Pousty gave an excellent talk called The Kick Ass Curve for developer relations. I recommend you watch the talk, one of the themes from Steve’s talk was that we need to make things easier for developers so they can become successful, and fast.

Prompts

A prompt is a call to action, trigger or cue for a behavior to happen. In the context of Developer Relations, a call to action can be a hands-on workshop that a developer can attend, or an online event. It could also be a friend recommending the technology. It can also be an interesting and easy to follow step by step tutorial that you saw in an email newsletter, an interesting blog post, article or an interesting tweet. All these prompts can lead to: “hey, I want to try this”.

Summary

Looking at the Fogg Behavior Model, we want to stay above the green Action line. Staying above the line means a developer is motivated, and it is easy for her to complete something and the prompted has worked. I believe most developers are very motivated. Where we can make a bigger difference is in the Ability.  To make developers successful, we need to strive to make things easier such as produce high quality documentation.

There are probably other ways to apply this to Developer Relations (or I might be complete off, hey, who knows). Would love to know what you think, please leave any feedback in comments.

If you want to learn more about the Fogg Behavior Model, you can pre-order BJ’s forthcoming book, Tiny Habits: The Small Changes that Change Everything. For the first time ever, BJ explains the Behavior Model in depth for a global audience. tinyhabits.com/book.

Using online meetups to scale your Developer Relations program

Online events is one of the best ways to scale your developer relations program. Online events such as webinars have been used for a long time to reach developers anywhere in the world. After a webinar, the video of the webinar can be shared and uploaded to YouTube (or any other web site). This allows developers to watch the recording who couldn’t attend it live and also by anyone else. Developers can watch it anywhere in the world, any time. And that’s exactly how a video allows you to scale.

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What I Learned Attending a Serverless Conference

Four weeks ago (this week) I attended the Serverlessconf in San Francisco. The following are my notes, observations, opinions and pictures from the conference (in no particular order).

Serverless Awesome 😎

Serverless is awesome because:

  • Build apps faster
  • Development focused
  • Serverless architecture offers the most productivity and agility
  • Never think about servers
  • Never think about cost (🤔)
  • Never think about performance

A common message that I have been hearing (and reading) is that serverless allows to concentrate on app business/logic. And that’s true. You write the code and the cloud platform simply runs your function, it ensures virtually unlimited scalability and you only pay when you function is running. No need to worry about servers, maintenance, deployment, etc.

As a side note, I find “allows to concentrate on app business/ logic” message interesting because every new technology/software/framework in the past had the same message.

AWS Lambda is the Leader

AWS Lambda is no doubt the leader in the serverless space right now. Probably because they were the first to introduce serverless on their cloud. I think most non-Amazon speakers mentioned or used AWS Lambda. They are closely followed by Microsoft with Azure Functions, then Google Cloud Functions and then IBM Cloud Functions.

Contaners vs. Functions

A number of talks mentioned containers vs functions. It’s not really one vs. the other. Functions are easier and give you higher abstraction. Containers give you more control and flexibility. It depends on the context and the problem you are trying to solve. In general this is how it looks:

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How Not to Send a Marketing Email

Today I received this email:

Subject: reconnect [company name]

Hi Max,

I noticed that Appery, LLC and [company name] had been in contact in the past and thought now would be a good time to reconnect.

Do you have a few minutes this afternoon?

[name]
Marketing Specialist

I deleted the email but then looked at it again.

There is absolutely zero value in this email (besides writing this blog post). Even if we had been in contact before, what are we connecting about now? This email shows that very little effort was put into writing this email.

I’d expect the first word in the subject to be capitalized. Also, there is no reason to say Appery, LLC. We don’t say Twitter Inc., or Facebook Inc.

If you want us to reconnect please tell me why you think we should connect. Maybe you just released a brand new API and built an app using Appery.io and want to show me the app so we can write a blog post about it. Something like this.

The Hybrid vs. Native Question Answered: Appery.io + Ionic

 

ionic_logo1

The debate between developing hybrid vs. native apps has been going on for a long time, and while it’s sure to continue long into the future, the argument for the hybrid model is getting stronger every day.

Making the Switch

Some of the topmost brands have recently ditched native and gone hybrid. With hybrid frameworks like Ionic and Apache Cordova (PhoneGap) becoming more mature, the assumption that a native app performs better is outdated.

In fact, the trend towards HTML5 and hybrid apps is stronger than ever; a recent Gartner report says that 90% of all Enterprise apps will be HTML5 or Hybrid by the end of this year.

Continue reading “The Hybrid vs. Native Question Answered: Appery.io + Ionic”

Get Your Mobile Development Questions Answered – Appery.io Office Hours

View this recording to get your mobile development questions answered. We held our first Office Hours session where Appery.io developers asked questions and we answered them in real time.

Want to learn more? Check out our YouTube channel for many more videos on mobile development.

What’s New in Appery.io – API Express, Ionic Framework

This webinar covers:

  • API Express – for integrating SQL databases
  • Ionic Framework
  • Server Code versioning

How to Build Mobile Apps Fast – Mobile Camp LA

MobileCampLogo

I will be at Mobile Camp LA on Saturday to show how to build hybrid apps fast with Appery.io. If you are in the area, definitely check it out. The 1-day conference has a pretty awesome schedule.

Pictures from Bay Area Enterprise Mobile App Meetup – Creating Apps with Appery.io

Last week I showed how to build mobile apps at the Bay Area Enterprise Mobile App Meetup. Here are some pictures from the event.