Why Developer Advocacy programs should consider working with partners

One of the goals of many developer advocacy programs is to reach more new developers. One approach that I leveraged when I was at Appery.io and we leverage even more at IBM Developer is working with partners.  In this blog post I want to share a few reasons why working partners has benefits.

We work with organizations such as Women Who Code, Hacker Dojo, The Den and others. These organizations have their own vibrant developer communities. We also work with developer companies such as Twilio, Slack, Cloudinary, Dashbot, JFrog and others. These companies have their own vibrant developer communities.

There are a number of factors why we like working with partners.

First, and probably the most important – working with partners and external communities allows us to provide developer education to developers who we probably wouldn’t reach otherwise. At the same time, the partner is able to tap in our growing developer community. This has a lot of value to both organizations. A one-off event is probably fine but we like to build a relationship with these organizations. We ty to be consistent and host a monthly event. If one event a month is too often, you can try to do once every two month. Event frequency is really up to you.

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How content creates content

A big part of many developer advocacy programs is content. Content can be in the form of tutorials, blog posts, videos and hands-on workshops and other forms. Coming up with content ideas is not always easy. In this blog post I’m going to share some ideas how to simplify content creation.

The IBM Developer SF team hosts weekly events. We host at least one in-person event and one online event (webinar/online meetup). For every in-person workshop we host an online event. It’s usually best to host the online event after the in-person event as people who couldn’t make the in-person event can watch the online version (but the other way is also fine).  The in-person event is about two hours and the online event is usually 40 minutes.  So yes, the content covered will be different but the basis will be the same. This is the first example where doing a hands-on workshop easily creates content for an online event.  The in-person event doesn’t necessarily need to be a meetup/workshop type event. It can also be a conference talk, a panel or a Q&A. It can really be anything.

We we host our online events on Crowdcast, the event is automatically recorded and the recording is available a few minutes after the event is over. The video can be downloaded and uploaded to your YouTube channel. Right there you have another piece of content. You can also take the video and create a blog post with it. Embed the video in the blog post with a short description of what you covered. That’s another content idea.

Here is an example of how you can start:

content-creates-content-1

This is nice considering this all from a single content piece.

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DevRel Q&A with Matthew Revell from Hoopy

I did a Q&A with Matthew Revell from Hoopy on Developer Advocacy.

Matthew: Tell me about your role at IBM.

Max: I joined IBM about a year and a half ago and work in the Developer Advocacy organization. I lead a wonderful team of Developer Advocates and we cover the North America West region. The majority of our time we spend in the San Francisco Bay Area. The team provides developer education and covers technologies such as Watson AI, Containers, Serverless, Blockchain, Node.js and Machine Learning.

We run weekly in-person and online developer education events in the San Francisco Bay Area. We love to partner with other companies and organizations such as Women Who Code, Hacker Dojo, and others to host joint events. This works extremely well for us. We also attend and speak at local conferences and publish content such as tutorial, how-to’s, and videos.

Matthew: What brought you to this point in your career?

Read the rest of the Q&A.