SF DevRel meetup at MuleSoft – what I learned and notes

On July 29, 2019 I attended the SF DevRel meetup at MuleSoft. The meetup was held at the Salesforce Tower. Jordan Schuetz and Sabrina Marechal from MuleSoft gave an overview of MuleSoft’s Developer Relations program. The following are my notes and what I learned. Based on what I learned, MuleSoft has an excellent Developer Advocacy team and program 👏.

Note: I highlighted (bold) their best approaches, in my opinion.

Continue reading “SF DevRel meetup at MuleSoft – what I learned and notes”

Interesting content ideas you may consider

Content is usually one of the core components of most Developer Relations programs. Technical content such as tutorials, how-to’s, articles is a great way to scale your program. Previously I shared how one piece of content can help you create more content and also where to publish content. In this blog post I will share interesting content ideas that you may consider beyond the standard tutorial or a how-to.

You will learn about the following content ideas:

  • Notes or summary from a conference, meetup
  • Event in 10 pictures
  • Links to series of articles
  • Links to previous month video recordings

Continue reading “Interesting content ideas you may consider”

Code, Content and Community

IBM Developer’s philosophy to working with developers is: Code, Content and Community.

Earlier this year I did a short presentation on this topic and how we work with developers at SFHTML 5 meetup in San Francisco. You can watch the 5-minute video below.

 

Where to publish content?

There are plenty of web sites where you can publish content. But, what’s the best place? Well, I’m not a fan of “best” anything. Your “best” is up to you, what works for you, based on your requirements and will be different for everyone. In this blog post I will share my recommendations where to publish content and you can use them to decide (or not) where to publish.

I wanted to publish this article for some time and also because of recent controversy with Medium. You can read about it here and here.

There are many web sites where you can publish content. This is just a short list of web sites:

  • Medium (plus various Medium publications)
  • Devada (formerly Dzone)
  • Dev.to
  • LinkedIn (Publishing platform)
  • InfoQ
  • Personal blog
  • Work blog
  • and many others…

Continue reading “Where to publish content?”

Notes from DevRelCon SF 2019

I attended DevRelCon in San Francisco on June 6-7. It was a superb event, with great speakers and awesome community. The following are my notes (not complete sentences) and pictures from the event.

Being Better At Developer Relations with Kathy Sierra’s ‘The Kick Ass Curve’

Steve Pousty (CrunchyData)

  • Steve’s talk focused on how to be better at Developer Relations. Steve demonstrated this concept using Kathy Sierra’s “The Kick Ass Curve”
  • You can find his slides here
  • DevRel goal
    • Make users happy and successful with your product/service
  • Get users to be awesome in the least possible time

    devrelcon-steve-curve1
    Developer Relations success curve
  • Different companies can have different curves
    • Background knowledge and experience of users (don’t control)
    • Quality of documentation and teaching material (control)
    • The actual design of the product/API (control)
    • The size and helpfulness of your community
  • We often disagree with Product Managers and Engineers because PMs and Engineers think they are at a different place on the curve. PM and Engineers are familiar with the service/product and usually don’t experience “learning” about the service/product like outside developers
  • Summary
    • Think about the audience (who you are targeting and how to get the pas the suck zone ASAP)
    • If we can’t get people out o the suck zone before they give up – we will never get them to experience power
    • Remember, when “talking” to others, to think about where they are on the curve
    • Use the curve when it helps, ignore it when it is doesn’t

Continue reading “Notes from DevRelCon SF 2019”

Notes 📝, Pictures 📷 and More💡from Developer Relations Conference 🥑

At the end of March I attended the Evans Data Developer Relations Conference in San Mateo. Overall it was a great conference 🥑. I took notes and pictures and want to share them with you here. Just a heads up, these are my notes mostly in bulleted list format, of things that I think I heard and most are not complete sentences 🤷🏽‍♂️

Session: The Trifecta of Greater Good: Developer Advocacy in Practice via Code, Content, and Community.
Name: Willie Tejada
Company: IBM

 

  • IBM Chief Developer Advocate Willie Tejada shared IBM’s approach to Developer Advocacy using the Code, Content and Community practice
    • Code
      • Large collection of Code Patterns
      • A Code Pattern is
        • 360-degree of the solution
        • Code on GitHub
        • Architecture/flow diagram
        • Video, tutorial
      • Helping developers solve problems quickly
    • Content
      • Large collection of tutorial, blogs, how-to’s, videos
    • Community
      • In-person events, community events and community support
        • Working with organizations such as Women Who Code
  • On marketing to developers
    • It’s not true that developers don’t want to be marketed to, they are simply very very educated “consumers”
    • Willie then gave an example of buying an expresso machine (such as Nespresso)
      • People will spend a disproportional amount of time learning about the machine and how it works. When they go to the store to buy it, if the sales person knows less than the buyer the buyer will be frustrated. We don’t like when we go to buy something and we know more about the product than the person selling it to us
  • Everyone can have Code/Content/Community strategy
  • For a very long time there were to main platform Java vs. .Net. Now it’s a single platform based on K8s
  • How do we engage a larger developer community, outside of enterprises
  • Call for Code
    • Invite 22 million developers to solve disaster preparedness problems
    • Engage developers outside IBM’s core (enterprise dev.)
      • Startups
      • Schools/universities
    • Ask them to help with solutions to help with disaster preparedness

Continue reading “Notes 📝, Pictures 📷 and More💡from Developer Relations Conference 🥑”

Using online meetups to scale your Developer Relations program

Online events is one of the best ways to scale your developer relations program. Online events such as webinars have been used for a long time to reach developers anywhere in the world. After a webinar, the video of the webinar can be shared and uploaded to YouTube (or any other web site). This allows developers to watch the recording who couldn’t attend it live and also by anyone else. Developers can watch it anywhere in the world, any time. And that’s exactly how a video allows you to scale.

Continue reading “Using online meetups to scale your Developer Relations program”

Developer Relations Conference in 10 pictures 🥑📸

This week I attended Evans Data Developer Relations Conference held in San Mateo. It was a great conference with great speakers. I took a lot of notes and will publish a separate blog post about the conference. For now, here are 10 pictures from the conference.

devrelconf-program
Data Evans Developer Relations Conference 2019

Continue reading “Developer Relations Conference in 10 pictures 🥑📸”

Active developers vs. awareness events, an approach we are trying

If you in Developer Relations space then hosting and speaking at events is probably a big part of your job.

There are of many type of events that developers go to: meetups, workshops, conferences, online meetups/webinars, Lunch & Learn events, panels and others.

Metrics is the holy grail in Developer Relations. One type of a metric that many companies track is the number of active developers on their platform. Similar metrics can be number of apps created, number services created, etc.

One metric for us is a number of active developers on the IBM Cloud platform. As you can image, that’s a metric for the larger Developer Advocacy organization at IBM and also company-wide. So we got a lot of help.

What is an active developer? Every company can define it differently but usually it’s a developer who registered for a cloud account and created a service (there is also a time window when the developer has to be active).

Continue reading “Active developers vs. awareness events, an approach we are trying”

So, how does your solution compare to…

Competition

If you have been doing Developer Advocacy for some time, it’s very likely you heard this question:

So, how does your solution compare to <insert_competitor_solution>

This is probably not a question of if (if someone will ask but) but a question of when. This question can be asked at a conference, meetup, workshop, an online forum or even just via email.

There is no right or wrong answer here – as usually in developer advocacy. I want to share some guidelines I shared with my team on how to respond to this question.

Unless you have a deep knowledge of the competitor’s solution and can offer a constructive comparison, don’t offer a comparison. With so many different frameworks, libraries, tools, clouds – it’s not easy to have a strong understanding of how competitor’s products work.

Never bash the competition. It doesn’t make you look good and most likely damages your credibility, reputation and your company’s. It also damages any goodwill you had with the community. It shows weakness.

Continue reading “So, how does your solution compare to…”