Tiggzi And The Backend as a Service Ecosystem Map by Kinvey

Our friends at Kinvey posted an update to their really nice Backed as a Service Ecosystem map. Some call it the subway map, the Pacman map, or you can also look at it as “Where we fly map”.

Thank you to Kinvey for including Tiggzi, we really appreciate it.

Tiggzi is right there:

A lot has changed in Tiggzi in the past couple of months so I would like to offer an update. Hopefully the map can be updated.

I don’t believe Mobile SDK is the best fit for Tiggzi (and other players such Sencha and Appcelerator). Tiggzi is much more than a mobile SDK, in fact, it’s a mobile app platform (more about it below). One suggestion is to add a new line that would include Tiggzi and others such as Appcelerator.

Tiggzi is a mobile app platform, and one of its biggest components is the mobile app builder.


Drag and drop app builder

It’s a cloud-based, drag and drop builder (IDE) for creating HTML5, jQuery Mobile and PhoneGap apps. As Tiggzi app builder uses jQuery Mobile and PhoneGap to create apps — it’s probably best to list it on a separate line with lines going to jQuery Mobile and PhoneGap (already exists). Again, this is just my opinion.

In early July we launched Backend Services under io.tiggzi.com. The first feature in the backend services is a cloud database.


Database features


Database web console

We are also working on Push, File storage, Server-side code, and Analytics features. I think there should be a line going from Tiggzi to BaaS line (io.tiggzi.com) – similar to Sencha’s connection to Sencha.io.

To summarize, this is Tiggzi mobile platform:

  • Visual UI builder (HTML5, JavaScript, CSS, libraries such as jQuery Mobile, PhoneGap, etc)
  • 3rd party REST API services
    • Plug-ins (pre-packaged API services and pages)
  • Backend services
    • Database
    • Push (available soon)
    • File storage (soon)
    • Server-side code (soon)
    • Analytics (soon)
  • HTML5 app hosting
  • Binary build

The New Paradigm: Cloud Services, Cloud Tools

This article was originally published in Software Developer’s Journal.

Cloud Services

In the past year or so, we have witnessed a major shift from client-server to client-cloud. This shift is primarily
fueled by two factors: mobile devices exceeding desktop computers and the thousands of different APIs available on the Internet today. What started in early 2000 on eBay and Amazon has become a real revolution in 2012 with thousands of companies, from Twitter and Facebook to AT&T, offering cloud-based services.
REST APIOne of the most common ways to access private or public service APIs is via REST requests.
In the client-server approach an organization builds applications that consume its own internal content and
resources. However, even large IT organizations such as AT&T, Verizon and Amazon have come to realize that
they are no match for the social consumer and social enterprise developers out there. By making APIs publicly
available, these organizations hope that developers and “citizen developers” will come and build applications
and mobile apps on top of their services.
Citizen developers at workAnalysts at Gartner see a trend toward app creation independent of IT. They predict that by 2014, citizen developers – employees outside of IT and software development – will build 25% of new business applications. In 2007, they built less than 5%.
One of the best-known API success stories comes from Amazon: Its cloud service APIs let outsiders access
the company’s massive data centers. Twitter, with its deceptively simple 140-character message model, exploded thanks to its API. In fact, you probably read and write tweets via a Twitter application or mobile app rather
than going directly to Twitter’s Web site. Facebook’s Graph API has spawned a whole industry of apps to support its hundreds of millions of users.

Just looking at popular ProgrammableWeb site that lists close to 5,500 APIs (at the time of writing this) and 6,500 mashups or apps created that consume the various APIs. The city of San Francisco, already a mecca for startups, technology, and innovation, has made a big push into attracting developers by making city data and other date from its data.SFgov.org Web site available via API. For example, the city’s MUNI (city bus service) API is available for developers to build apps with using information about bus stations, schedules, and arrivals. Even the United States government jumped on the API bandwagon by making available data.gov, which provides public access to high-value machine-readable data sets generated by the U.S government.
Continue reading “The New Paradigm: Cloud Services, Cloud Tools”

Tiggzi: Build Windows Phone Apps With jQuery Mobile, PhoneGap

You can now build jQuery Mobile apps in Tiggzi and export the app for Windows Phone (with PhoneGap).

VS Project is a Windows Phone PhoneGap project. We will be adding binary build as well. To get a binary, you have two options: 1) build it yourself; 2) take it to PhoneGap Build.

Windows Phone Export is Coming To Tiggzi App Builder

Yes, this is pretty cool:

Windows Phone export in Tiggzi will be available tomorrow.

Create Windows Phone App with jQuery Mobile, PhoneGap and Tiggzi App Builder in 3 Easy Steps

Yesterday we attended mobile hackathon sponsored by Microsoft and PhoneGap. The goal was to build a PhoneGap app and install in on Windows Phone. We used Tiggzi App Builder, PhoneGap Build and very quickly installed an app on Windows Phone. Thanks to @jccim for inviting us and giving us a brand new Windows Phone for testing.

Step 1.

Build an HTML5/jQuery Mobile app in Tiggzi Mobile App Builder:

Step 2.

Export the app as HTML/JavaScript/CSS:

We will be adding Windows Phone support to Tiggzi in May (first source code export, followed by binary build).

Step 3.

Upload the app to PhoneGap Build, download the Windows Phone version:

You are done!