Developers don’t hate marketing

A few weeks ago I attended Evans Data Developer Marketing Summit. During a panel one person said:

“Developers hate marketing”

I don’t agree with that.

I think developers don’t like bad marketing.

People in general don’t like bad marketing so I don’t think developers are any special here.

When someone says “developers hate marketing”, I always associate this with an old car salesperson:

old-car-salesmen
Source: https://carsalesprofessional.com/why-are-car-salesmen-so-annoying/

No one would disagree that this is bad marketing (or sales), most of us probably experienced that. These folks usually use shady tactics and push features, not solutions.

Most will agree that (most) organizations today don’t do this.

At Evans Data Developer Relations Conference in March 2019, Willie Tejada, IBM Chief Developer Advocate said this:

On marketing to developers:

It’s not true that developers don’t want to be marketed to, they are simply very very educated “consumers”.

Here is an example of buying an espresso machine (such as Nespresso)
People will spend a disproportional amount of time learning about the machine and how it works. When they go to the store to buy it, if the sales person knows less than the buyer the buyer will be frustrated. We don’t like when we go to buy something and we know more about the product than the person selling it to us.

There are many great books on marketing out there. A great book I recently read is This is Marketing by Seth Godin. Here is how the book defines marketing:

Marketing is the generous act of helping someone solve a problem. Their problem.

and this one:

Marketers offer solutions, opportunities for humans to solve their problems and move forward.

There is nothing inherently bad about marketing to developers. Companies simply need to be helping solve developer’s problems. If we do this, then we won’t need to say that developers hate marketing (hopefully).

Our goal should always be to share outcomes and results, not features. My all time favorite resource is Adam DuVander’s Share Knowledge, Not Features.

I think here is one good example of that (there are thousands more of course):

webflow-devmarketing1
Source: http://webflow.com

Webflow is a No Code platform to build websites. Above is their home page. Webflow is not telling people that they have a visual HTML editor – that’s a feature. They are telling people what problems they can solve, what is the outcome – build a better website, faster, without coding.

Whether you call it developer marketing or something else – let’s help developers solve their problems, show them solutions, outcomes and share knowledge 🙌

“The Making of a Manager”, a book I highly recommend and some of my favorite parts

There are thousands of books on how to be a manager and I’m sure many of them are very good. I just finished reading The Making of a Manager by Julie Zhou. I loved the book and highly recommend to new managers, not so new managers and people who might want to be managers one day.

TheMakingofaManager

Many management books out there give you a lot of theoretical advice on how to be a manager or just advice that’s not applicable to real world. What I loved about Julie’s book is that it’s full of very practical advice and tips. You can take it and use today. I liked that Julie wasn’t afraid to share that she was scared many times, that she wasn’t sure if she made the right decision and that’s it’s OK (and actually beneficial as that’s how we grow) to make mistakes because we are all humans. Reading the book I said many times “oh yes, that’s how I felt” and “oh, and I was in exact the same situation”. This kind of connection makes this an excellent book that I highly encourage to read. Seeing how the Julie dealt with various challenges and grew to be VP of Design at Facebook, is a great learning experience.

Continue reading ““The Making of a Manager”, a book I highly recommend and some of my favorite parts”

Applying the Fogg Behavior Model to Developer Relations

I found about the Fogg Behavior Model from #saashacker newsletter. I found this model super interesting and right away thought if it can be applied to Developer Relations.

Fogg Behavior Model Graphic 2019

First, what is the Fogg Behavior Model? You can find a detailed explanation on https://www.behaviormodel.org/. The model has three main components: Motivation, Ability and Prompts.

The model says that to influence someone to do something, you have just two levers:

  • Motivation – how much someone wants to do something
  • Ability – how easy it is to do the thing

The third component

  • Prompts – is a call to action, trigger or cue for a behavior to happen

So, could this model be applied to developers? Let’s look at each component and see how it can be applied to Developer Relations.

Motivation

So what can motivate developers? Here is a list of motivations:

  • Solving a (challenging) problem (at work or a personal project)
  • Giving back to community. For example, contributing to an open source project
  • Career growth, personal growth, learning

Ability

Ability is how easy it is to do something. I think ability has a strong connection to Developer Relations. We (Developer Advocates) always strive to make things easier for developers. A big part of this is making our documentation, tutorials, videos, guides and everything else easy to follow and complete.

In June at DevRelCon in San Francisco, Steve Pousty gave an excellent talk called The Kick Ass Curve for developer relations. I recommend you watch the talk, one of the themes from Steve’s talk was that we need to make things easier for developers so they can become successful, and fast.

Prompts

A prompt is a call to action, trigger or cue for a behavior to happen. In the context of Developer Relations, a call to action can be a hands-on workshop that a developer can attend, or an online event. It could also be a friend recommending the technology. It can also be an interesting and easy to follow step by step tutorial that you saw in an email newsletter, an interesting blog post, article or an interesting tweet. All these prompts can lead to: “hey, I want to try this”.

Summary

Looking at the Fogg Behavior Model, we want to stay above the green Action line. Staying above the line means a developer is motivated, and it is easy for her to complete something and the prompted has worked. I believe most developers are very motivated. Where we can make a bigger difference is in the Ability.  To make developers successful, we need to strive to make things easier such as produce high quality documentation.

There are probably other ways to apply this to Developer Relations (or I might be complete off, hey, who knows). Would love to know what you think, please leave any feedback in comments.

If you want to learn more about the Fogg Behavior Model, you can pre-order BJ’s forthcoming book, Tiny Habits: The Small Changes that Change Everything. For the first time ever, BJ explains the Behavior Model in depth for a global audience. tinyhabits.com/book.

Share outcomes and results, not features

I recently subscribed to #saashackers daily newsletter. Every morning you get a short SaaS growth case study in your inbox. It’s a quick 3-4 minute read that I recommend you try.

Today’s email talked about Mailchimp and how they got to $400 million in revenue from just 550 employees.

What caught my eye was this image and the text that followed:

mailchimp-saashacker
Source: #saashacker newsletter

text after the picture:

They are selling an outcome, not features.

They are selling the thing people actually want, not their software.

Whether you are a direct to consumer brand with 50,000 customers or a mommy blogger with 1,000 subscribers, you want:

  • To build relationships with your customers
  • To increase sign up (by 250%)

You don’t (necessarily) want:

  • Email templates
  • CMS integrations

Source: https://saashacker.co

And this has a very close connection to Developer Relations (or Developer Marketing).

We should be sharing outcomes and results, not features. We should be showing people how to solve problems, not our software.

I’m sure most of you know this but I think it’s worth mentioning. I personally tend to forget about this (sometimes) and also it’s much easier to talk about features than benefits.

Most of you probably also said: “wait.. this is not new at all” 🤦‍♀️🤦‍♂️

You are absolutely correct 🤩

Adam DuVander has created and shared this wonderful page: Share Knowledge, Not Features: The Secret of Marketing to Developers is to Not Use Marketing. It’s Developer Relations classic and my favorite Developer Relations resource. I highly recommend you read and bookmark this page. Adam explains that we should be sharing knowledge, not features.

So, let’s try to share outcomes, results, problem solving and knowledge, not features✌️

Where to publish content?

There are plenty of web sites where you can publish content. But, what’s the best place? Well, I’m not a fan of “best” anything. Your “best” is up to you, what works for you, based on your requirements and will be different for everyone. In this blog post I will share my recommendations where to publish content and you can use them to decide (or not) where to publish.

I wanted to publish this article for some time and also because of recent controversy with Medium. You can read about it here and here.

There are many web sites where you can publish content. This is just a short list of web sites:

  • Medium (plus various Medium publications)
  • Devada (formerly Dzone)
  • Dev.to
  • LinkedIn (Publishing platform)
  • InfoQ
  • Personal blog
  • Work blog
  • and many others…

Continue reading “Where to publish content?”

Podcasts

If some you will think that I have been living under a rock 🧗‍♂️ – that’s fair 🤷🏽‍♂️. In the past year I got totally hooked on podcasts. I know, I know – the first podcasts started appearing as early as 2003 and exploded in popularity around 2010.

I guess it’s better late than never.

I was always a semi-news junkie, listening mostly to news in the car (and reading news a lot). The news on the radio is usually repeated over and over again so it can get boring rather fast. But the world of podcasts has opened a completely new world to me. The sheer number and the quality of podcasts is simply amazing. With so many amazing and educational podcasts, it’s like having a private radio station where you build and customize the playlist and can listen anywhere and anytime. Podcasts provide superb education, entertainment and are free.

Continue reading “Podcasts”

My short time with T-Mobile: the good, the bad and the ugly

After 15+ years with AT&T Mobile I decided to switch to T-Mobile. The reasons I switched to T-Mobile are in the Good section. The reasons are went back to AT& are in the Bad/Ugly sections. I was with T-Mobile for five days and used the phone in the Bay Area (east bay and San Francisco).

The Good

  • Excellent customer service. Any time I reached out to them on Twitter via DM, I’d get a reply within 10-15 minutes. They genuinely want to help you 👏
  • Price. T-Mobile monthly price per line is usually $10-$15 cheaper than AT&T or Verizon. For example, right now they have a promotion where you pay $40/line. For three lines it is $120 and the nice thing is that all taxes and fees are included. In California, you get close to $5/line in taxes and fees. They also include Standard Netflix subscription (with 2 or more lines), that’s another $10.99 🤑
  • I like their Un-Carrier principles 🙌
  • It’s also fun to watch their CEO John Legere tweet and make fun of the competition 🤪
  • Extra benefits such as texting and data abroad (although at very slow speed), free in-flight texting on Go-go enabled flights (and one hour free internet) ✈️
  • If coverage where you live is not good, T-Mobile will send you a free CellSpot or signal extender for free. CellSpot connects to your WiFi and creates a mini cell tower right in your house 📶

The Bad

  • Coverage is weak. In places where their coverage map shows strong coverage, you get weak coverage. My service was showing 1-2 bars most of the time 👎
  • T-Mobile support will offer you a free CellSpot or signal extender if coverage where you live is not good. I think they know their coverage is not good so they right away offer these units for free 📡
  • Call quality (voice) is not as good (at least compared to AT&T).☎︎
  • Many other people are also reporting that they have bad service/coverage 📴
  • Anytime you tweet about bad coverage (like here), T-Mobile support will respond (that’s good) and tell you they will help. After a few tweets like that you realize there is nothing they can do (they can’t magically add more towers) 🙅‍♂️
  • T-Mobile CEO John Legere making of the competition is fun at the first. When you realize the service is far behind the competition, these tweets are not as fun anymore 😶

The Ugly

  • Coverage inside buildings is very bad and in some cases non-existent.  I was in the heart of San Francisco with virtually no coverage inside an office building even thought their coverage map said it was in strong coverage area 😡

The Disappointment

I was eager to try T-Mobile due to everything I listed in the Good section. I was genuinely surprised and disappointment at how poor quality their service/coverage is in 2019. I always knew that T-Mobile was behind AT&T and Verizon in coverage but I didn’t realize how far behind, even today. I complete understand that each carrier has some areas where coverage is not good but I was expecting much stronger service/coverage in the San Francisco Bay Area and coverage inside buildings is even worse 😔

I think T-Mobile knows its network is not as good and so has to be different than AT&T/Verizon on something else – and that something is lower prices (and that does attract new customers).

I like T-Mobile and what they stand for. T-Mobile is in the process of merging with Spring. I hope after the merger is finalized, they will significantly improve their coverage and I will give them another try 🙏

Appery.io Wants to End The HTML5 vs Native Debate With New App Auto Update Capability

HTML5_Logo_512

Ben Kepes in Network World article: Appery.io aims to end the HTML5 vs native debate.

Mobile Enterprise Solutions: MEAPs or DIY Tools?

lowcode2

Today, many companies looking to enter the world of enterprise mobile app development seemingly face a difficult development strategy choice: DIY tools vs. traditional enterprise mobile app development platforms (MEAPs). Choosing the right strategy for your enterprise can be a daunting task, especially when complicated by the influx of many business users within enterprises that want to participate in mobile development. In that case,  the lowered skills barrier would make DIY tools an attractive choice, but the results of such tools are not typically enterprise grade, due to their lack of flexibility.

With that in mind, let’s take a look at the two options. It’s important to remember that both options have pros and cons, and either choice requires compromise. The options become largely a choice between flexibility and efficiency.

Continue reading “Mobile Enterprise Solutions: MEAPs or DIY Tools?”

What Makes an Ideal Low Code App Development Platform?

Laptop with code
Photo from unsplash.com

The Current State of the Mobile Landscape

If someone stepped forward a decade or two ago and claimed that, in the near future, we would all have pocket-sized touchscreen devices that acted as gateways to multiple technological feats such as browsing the internet at high speeds, playing graphics intensive games, hailing cabs, booking flights, scheduling restaurant reservations, and purchasing products, you probably would have thought it nothing more than a creative mind’s wishful thinking. And who would have blamed you? At a time when these devices existed only in the realm of science fiction, no one would have believed, much less predicted, that one day, these incredibly high tech, hand-held gadgets would have such a huge impact on our day to day lives.

Continue reading “What Makes an Ideal Low Code App Development Platform?”